By Lizzy Smith | Posted - Sep 14th, 2015

 

 

 

 

More About Ixazomib for Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma: What Is It & How You Can Get It

Takeda Pharmaceutical Company announced that the U.S. FDA has granted Priority Review status for ixazomib, the first investigational oral proteasome inhibitor for the treatment of patients with relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma. “We are encouraged that both the U.S. and European regulatory bodies have determined that the ixazomib applications qualify for an expedited review, underscoring the importance of new treatment options for patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma,” said Melody Brown, Vice President of Regulatory Affairs, Takeda. “Our ixazomib program is designed to evaluate whether sustained therapy with an oral proteasome inhibitor improves the outcomes of patients living with multiple myeloma. There is a significant unmet medical need in multiple myeloma and we look forward to working with the regulatory bodies to bring ixazomib to patients.” The FDA may grant Priority Review status, which includes expedited review, to the evaluation of applications for drugs that treat a serious condition and, if approved, would provide a significant improvement in safety or efficacy over existing treatment. Ixazomib was recently granted accelerated assessment by the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) of the European Medicines Agency (EMA). The submission for ixazomib was primarily based on the results of the first pre-specified interim analysis of the pivotal Phase 3 trial, TOURMALINE-MM1. This study is an international, randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled clinical trial of 722 patients designed to evaluate the superiority of ixazomib plus lenalidomide and dexamethasone over placebo plus lenalidomide and dexamethasone in adult patients with relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma. Patients continue to be treated to progression in this trial and will be evaluated for long-term outcomes. About Ixazomib Ixazomib is an investigational oral proteasome inhibitor which is being studied in multiple myeloma, systemic light-chain (AL) amyloidosis, and other malignancies. Ixazomib was granted orphan drug designation in multiple myeloma in both the U.S. and Europe in 2011 and for AL amyloidosis in both the U.S. and Europe in 2012. Ixazomib received Breakthrough Therapy status by the U.S. FDA for relapsed or refractory AL amyloidosis in 2014. It is also the first oral proteasome inhibitor to enter Phase 3 clinical trials. Ixazomib’s clinical development program further reinforces Takeda’s ongoing commitment to developing innovative therapies for people living with multiple myeloma worldwide and the healthcare professionals who treat them. Five global Phase 3 trials are ongoing:

  • TOURMALINE-MM1, investigating ixazomib vs. placebo, in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone in relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma
  • TOURMALINE-MM2, investigating ixazomib vs. placebo, in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma
  • TOURMALINE-MM3, investigating ixazomib vs. placebo as maintenance therapy in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma following induction therapy and autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT)
  • TOURMALINE-MM4, investigating ixazomib vs. placebo as maintenance therapy in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma who have not undergone ASCT
  • TOURMALINE-AL1, investigating ixazomib plus dexamethasone vs. physician choice of selected regimens in patients with relapsed or refractory AL amyloidosis

To find all current clinical trials using ixazomib, click on this SparkCures link. The work has been done for you! Interested in a different drug in current clinical trial? Simply click here and find the drug listed alphabetically.

 
Lizzy Smith
About the Author

Lizzy Smith - Lizzy Smith was diagnosed with myeloma in 2012 at age 44. Within days, she left her job, ended her marriage, moved, and entered treatment. "To the extent I'm able, I want to prove that despite life's biggest challenges, it is possible to survive and come out stronger than ever," she says.

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