By Greg Brozeit | Posted - Sep 24th, 2021

 

 

 

 

Live Myeloma Crowd Round Tables? Yes! Here’s Why.

The only thing certain about the pandemic is the continuing, seemingly never-ending uncertainty that comes with it.  What you are sure of today might be very questionable tomorrow.

On the other hand, we do have something now that we didn’t have at the beginning of the pandemic: experience. We now have significant experience with masks, social distancing, and most importantly with the efficacy of vaccines. We know they are effective. For myeloma patients who have not developed antibodies to the vaccines, they know who they are and that they need to take extra precautions. 

We also know that the Round Table programs we conducted during the pandemic have reached new audiences around the nation and the world.  We know many of you still want to view our programs and pledge to continue to make them available to you.

An important lesson we’ve learned over the past year-and-a-half is how valuable our focus—or deep-dives—into specific topics in myeloma are.  We will continue to keep that format with half-day programs with diverse topics for newly diagnosed and relapsed/refractory patients as well as those with precursor conditions.

One perk for attendees of live Round Tables, as veterans of our programs know, will be to engage with world-class thought leaders in myeloma.  Their questions will be answered in priority to those of the virtual audience.

Should we really be having live patient education meetings now?

Some still scratch their heads about conducting a live Myeloma Crowd Round Table in St. Louis, Missouri on Saturday, October 16.

In our view, for some people, yes.  For others, no.  But make it accessible to everyone who wants to take part.

For all of us, one thing we have learned to appreciate most during the past year-plus is the need we have for each other, too look each other in the eyes, even at a distance of six feet.  Those who are fully vaccinated can, following CDC guidelines. If you want to join us, please register here:

 

Register To Attend in St. Louis

 

Some of you who might want to attend live are rightfully resistant, either because active therapy prevents you from being vaccinated or being around others who might not be, or just because you remain cautious.  We encourage you to go this link:

 

Register For Virtual Webcast

 

And stay tuned for an announcement about a Myeloma Crowd Round Table in New York City on November 13, 2021!

 

Our response is built on a foundation of many pillars, including one that seeks to address the need of our growing audience and another that demands information to navigate their myeloma diagnoses.  These are our plans to meet their educational needs:

  • Resume live meetings following CDC hygiene and safety guidelines.  That means large rooms with a lot of space for distancing, boxed lunches, and one way flow of traffic.
  • Make programs available live on the internet for registered viewers, and through unedited video on our Facebook page after the program ends.
  • Post annotated videos of Myeloma Crowd Round Tables 4-6 weeks later.

Our pledge is to serve our community wherever it is with the informational and navigational resources the HealthTree Foundation: HealthTree Cure Hub, Myeloma Crowd Round Tables, Myeloma Community Chapters, and Myeloma Coaches.

 
Greg Brozeit
About the Author

Greg Brozeit - Greg Brozeit has been engaged in myeloma patient advocacy since 1998. He began working with the Myeloma Crowd in 2015. Prior to that, he consulted with Dr. Bart Barlogie at the University of Arkansas after working with the International Myeloma Foundation for 15 years. In the first half of his time with the IMF, he inaugurated the public policy advocacy program, patient support group outreach and conceived the regional community workshop program. In the latter half, he directed IMF Europe, organizing more than 100 physician and patient education programs. Prior to working in myeloma, Greg was a program and project director for the Center for Civic Education, the Alliance for Aging, and he also served as a legislative aide for U.S. Senator J. Bennett Johnston (D-LA). He began his career as an upper school teacher and boys soccer coach in New Orleans, LA. He earned his BA in political science from Loyola University in New Orleans and lives in northeast Ohio.

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