By Lizzy Smith | Posted - May 2nd, 2016

 

 

 

 

CLINICAL TRIAL: New Immunotherapy (Reovirus called Reolysin) Now Being Used for Relapsed/Refractory Myeloma with Bortezomib + Dex

A new immunotherapy called a reovirus is being used in combination with standard myeloma drugs in an early clinical trial. This reovirus helps boost tumor-fighting activities and has been studied with both allogeneic and autologous transplant. Researchers are now combining this reovirus, called Reolysin, with other standard myeloma drugs without transplant. Last December, results from ASH showed that Reolysin paired with carfilzomib helped all seven patients in the clinical trial respond. In a company press release, Oncolytics Biotech has announced the start of enrollment in a Phase Ib study of REOLYSIN combined with standard doses of bortezomib and dexamethasone in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma. This new trial is sponsored by the University of Southern California and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and about 18 patients will be enrolled in this study. This virus, called wild-type reovirus, may be able to infect cancer cells, slow the cancer growth and kill cancer cells. This phase Ib trial studies the safety and best dose of wild-type reovirus in combination with bortezomib and dexamethasone and to see how well they work in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has returned (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Bortezomib and dexamethasone may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving wild-type reovirus together with bortezomib and dexamethasone may be a better treatment for multiple myeloma. Dr. Daniel Fowler from the NIH has performed extensive work with Reolysin with both allo and auto transplants. To learn more about how Reolysin works, listen to Dr. Daniel Fowler on Myeloma Crowd Radio. To learn more about joining this trial, click here: Reolysin Trial  

 
Lizzy Smith
About the Author

Lizzy Smith - Lizzy Smith was diagnosed with myeloma in 2012 at age 44. Within days, she left her job, ended her marriage, moved, and entered treatment. "To the extent I'm able, I want to prove that despite life's biggest challenges, it is possible to survive and come out stronger than ever," she says.

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