Our Next Show: Safer and More Effective Allo Transplants in Myeloma and Targeting Precursor Myeloma Cells with William Matsui, MD, Johns Hopkins University, Friday, February 16 @ 2:30 Eastern

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Friday, February 16, 2018 @ 11:30 am Pacific, 12:30 pm Mountain, 1:30 pm Central, 2:30 pm Eastern

Call In by Phone to Listen Live: (347) 637-2631 or Listen Live Via Computer

Allogeneic stem cell transplant was the first ever immunotherapy available for multiple myeloma patients. Dr. Matsui shares how the Johns Hopkins allo transplant procedure has significantly improved safety concerns. His research is now focused on extending and deepening remissions with a new immunotherapy antibody given with transplant. Dr. Matsui will also share his latest research on precursor myeloma cells (called myeloma stem cells) and how they can be targeted before growing into full blown myeloma. 

William Matsui, MD  is the Head of the Myeloma program at Johns Hopkins. He’s also Professor of Oncology at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center and is a Member of the Department of Oncology, and Member of the Graduate Program in Pathobiology and Cellular and Molecular Medicine. He is on the editorial and review boards of Haematologica, Immunology, and Immunogenetic Insights, is a SPORE recipient award researcher in lymphoma in the past, and has won multiple teaching awards in the Johns Hopkins Department of Medicine and Oncology. He has received the Kimmel Foundation Scholar, Sidney Kimmel Foundation for Cancer Research Award, as well as the LLS Scholar in Clinical Research Award. Presently and for the past six years, Dr. Matsui has served on the NCI Investigational Drug Steering Committee and is Co-Chair for the Cancer Stem Cell Taskforce.

 Thanks to our episode sponsor, Takeda Oncology.

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About Author

Jenny A

Myeloma survivor, patient advocate, wife, mom of 6. Believer that patients can help accelerate a cure by weighing in and participating in clinical trials. Founder of Myeloma Crowd, Myeloma Crowd Radio and the CrowdCare Foundation.

2 Comments

  1. I have been told I have precancerous cells. I am interested in what is possible to prevent cancer from this horrible disease.

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